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How To Care for Your Swimwear


While swimming is quite minimalist in terms of gear you need in order to participate, you have to be mindful of the wear and tear on your suits. It's no secret that chlorine and the sun can be a damaging combination, and this is especially true when it comes to the effects it has on your swimwear.

Having to replace an old swimsuit is inevitable after an extended period of time, but there are a few things you can do to prolong the longevity of the suit and save yourself some money by putting a bit of extra care into your wear.

In this guide, we will discuss a handful of ways to care for and preserve the quality of your swimsuit.

Avoid Harsh Detergents

Just as the harsh chemicals in laundry detergents can be damaging to your skin and health, they can also destroy your swimsuits. The chemicals in some detergents can eat away at the fabric, which will eventually break down the shape and elasticity of the swimsuit. We recommend using a gentle detergent or swimsuit cleaner when washing your swimwear to avoid deterioration.

Say No To Detergent Bleach

This almost goes without saying, but stay away from the use of detergent bleach or bleaching chemicals when washing and rinsing any swimwear.

Hand Wash & Air Dry

The roughness of the inside of the washing machine and the intensity of the wash cycle can cause premature snags and holes in the swimsuit. Similarly, the heat from the dryer can result in color fading and can cause the swimsuit to lose its shape. For the best results and a longer lifespan, we suggest hand washing and air-drying your swimwear on a flat surface to prevent stretching and discoloration.

Don't Sit On Rough Surfaces

It's second nature to want to sit on the pool deck or starting blocks before and after a workout, however that can actually ruin your swimsuit. To reduce the chance of pilling—the tiny, fuzzy balls that appear on the surface of the garment—we advise you put a towel down before sitting on any rough or scratchy surfaces. Besides, who wants to sit on a scorching hot pool deck in summer?

Rinse The Suit In Cold Water

To help rid the swimsuit of chlorine, rinse it in cold water after every use. We highly recommend doing this immediately after taking the swimsuit off, even if you don't have the time to thoroughly wash the swimsuit with soap. By rinsing out the salt water and/or chlorine-based chemicals, it will help to prolong the longevity, color and elasticity of the suit.

Don't Forget About Your Wet Suit!

On your way home from the pool, utilize a mesh bag or wet-bag for your swimsuit to air out and dry. There's nothing worse than getting home to a suit that smells of mildew from being bunched up in the bottom of your swim bag.
 

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patty p
1 year ago.
when I get a new suit, I wash it gently in cold water, in the machine. I add a little vinegar to the wash, it seems to help with fading. I never wash the suit regular with soap. also I don't put suit with stays in the spinner
Loves to swim
2 years ago.
When washing lycra suits, upon final rinse in a cold wash, pop a few drops of fish tank de-chlorinator in your water. Agitate your suit or suits in it a bit in your clean sink or bucket and let them sit only for a few minutes. Once you've drained everything, hang the garments up to dry on plastic hangers in a reasonably dry and well-ventilated environment where they can drip dry. The nasty chlorine smell will be gone and your lycra suits will last considerably longer. There are other commercially available products that work as well. Sodium Thiosulphate is the desired active ingredient. Chlorine bonds to spandex fibers and eventually ruins them. Sodium Thiosulphate will break this bond and will not hurt you nor your suit. It is what is present in chlorine removing shampoos and suit washes as well. Give it a try.
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